Devasted 2

Wow!
Well that’s got to be the fastest and biggest response I’ve had to a post.
So let me clarify…
People don’t walk out of a showing saying that post screwed up the skin-tones, they say what a useless DP.
People don’t walk out of a showing saying that the editor zoomed too far into an image, they say that the AC couldn’t get it sharp.
People don’t walk out of a showing saying what a dreadful DCP, they say that the colourist screwed up.
People don’t walk out of a showing… I think you get the point now.
It’s not the people responsible that get blamed, it’s the image originators.
Well I’m not taking that.
Is my last post abusive and offensive? I hope so!
If we, the cinematographers, don’t stand up and scream when our images are messed up them nobody will and the rush into mediocrity will accelerate.
We are “The Guardians of the Image” and if in general we’re too chickenshit to shout when our work is damaged then we deserve what we get.
To all camera crew out there, stand up and be counted!!

Devastated

I’ve delayed writing this since I was at the cast and crew showing of The Taking.

I needed time to calm down and stop screaming.

The incredibly hard work of all the camera, lighting and grip crew has been devastated by incompetent uncaring post.

The DCP had obviously been made by a blind man who had left both his white stick and seeing eye dog behind.

Over saturated, weird gamma, blacks crushed, skin looking dreadful, thanks guys you just made our work look crap.

I’ve seen better looking grannies TV’s!!!

I graded the film and delivered 10 bit 2K DPX files, 2 versions, one log without film convert applied and one finished totally. I’d wanted to deliver higher res files but that was vetoed by the post supervisor.

During the conform and grade I’d reduced some of the extreme reframes that the editor had done, trying to keep the directors intentions intact but also trying to preserve image quality.

I didn’t agree with the reframes but ultimately that’s not down to me, I felt they reeked of low budget TV soaps.

The files I delivered had been graded on a system that was calibrated with Lightspace CMS, £3,000 of calibration kit.

Apart from the ridiculous looking images in the DCP there were also all kinds of reframes, zooms in and out and it looked like they had been made from the DPX’s not from the R3D’s so the image quality was horribly degraded.

I have no idea of the route that the images followed once they left me, they should have had the VFX added to DPX files at 2K and the DCP rendered from them.

I strongly suspect that they went through a compressed intermediate format and that was probably HD!

I had added a degree of mid-tone sharpness in resolve and was nervous that I’d overdone it, I needn’t have worried, the post guys managed to soften off the pictures wonderfully.

It was 6 months under 40 years ago that I first worked directly for a TV station, I thought that people weren’t attentive enough to what they were doing but didn’t know beter.

It was about 30 years ago that I moved into high budget commercials and met a lot of resistance from camera crews because I came from docco’s and TV. At the time I thought that this was unfair, looking back I realise what they were worried about.

TV is an area of work where “good enough” and “that’ll do” reign, almost nobody cares about getting things RIGHT!

The old line of “why is TV called a medium? because it’s never well done” was reinforced by your approach.

I was asked during the Q&A before the showing by a show organiser who had seen a video copy of the film, why did it look so different from a TV series that had been shot at roughly the same time in roughly the same locations? why did ours look cinematic and theirs look…

I pointed to the 60′ screen behind me and said “because I shot for that not for a tiny TV” I had repeatedly during the shoot reminded people that we were shooting a movie not a TV show.

I’ve offered to spend my own time and money making a decent DCP and deliverables if they’ll send me the final DPX’s and audio files.